What Time Is It, and What Day Is Today?

(Updated from the article, No One Knows The Day Or Hour – 27 Feb 2015

The Full Moon in September was visible this past Friday the 13th and Saturday the 14th.  In Jewish terminology, this past Full Moon was on the Sabbath.  This is during the sixth Hebrew month on the Jewish calendar, called Elul.  The next New Moon will mark the beginning of the seventh month of Tishrei, or Etanim.  This New Moon will also fall on Friday night/Saturday, the 27th/28th of September, two weeks following the Full Moon.  Simple, right?  Not for those who simply follow the calendar of modern Judaism for keeping the holidays, the set times of YHVH, the God of Israel, our Redeemer in Yeshua the Messiah/Jesus Christ.  Due to reckonings of their own (and sometimes directly connected with rejection of Yeshua as Messiah and Lord), the Jewish New Year — beginning in the 7th month, rather than in the first — cannot fall on a Sabbath or on a Sonday.  So, the Memorial of Trumpet Blasts (the actual name for the New Moon first day of the 7th month) will be commemorated on Sonday evening/Monday, or, on Sept 29/30, two days late (and neither the beginning of the New Moon, nor the “birth”/first thin crescent of light).  Yet, somehow, it will still be considered the first of the seventh lunar month on the Jewish calendar.  (see a fascinating study of this by Hannah Weiss at http://www.restorersofzion.org/NGF_forbidden_passover.htm ) (Note:  I am not advocating for a Messianic halacha in this matter.)

(see also my article about the New Moon here: https://www.streamsinthenegev.com/school-of-fish/the-new-moon-covered-or-revealed/ ) Continue reading “What Time Is It, and What Day Is Today?”

No One Knows The Day Or Hour – 27 Feb 2015

Mk 13:28-37   “Now learn this parable from the fig tree: When its branch has already become tender, and puts forth leaves, you know that summer is near. 29 So you also, when you see these things happening, know that it is near—at the doors! 30 Assuredly, I say to you, this generation will by no means pass away till all these things take place. 31 Heaven and earth will pass away, but My words will by no means pass away.

32 “But of that day and hour no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father. 33 Take heed, watch and pray; for you do not know when the time is. 34 It is like a man going to a far country, who left his house and gave authority to his servants, and to each his work, and commanded the doorkeeper to watch. 35 Watch therefore, for you do not know when the master of the house is coming—in the evening, at midnight, at the crowing of the rooster, or in the morning— 36 lest, coming suddenly, he find you sleeping. 37 And what I say to you, I say to all: Watch!”

What time is it?  (Does anybody really care?)  This is a question many in Israel ask!  What time is it?  If we are speaking the answer to the one asking, we might say, for example, 11:30.  And he/she would understand whether it was morning or night.  But if, for another example, we sent out an invitation and said, ‘Let’s get together at 9:00’, someone might ask:  ‘Do you mean in the morning, or in the evening?’ Had the invitation been for 21:00, it would have been understood here that it was for the evening.  Or had it said, 9pm, it would also have been understood by those who received the invitation.

What day is it?  I know that when we first immigrated to Israel, it took some time before Randi and I got used to Monday not being the first day of the week, i.e., Sonday!  We often would think that Monday was Tuesday!  We were confused for a while until we finally adjusted to Sonday being Sonday, the first day of the week, and also a work day.  So, if we would say to someone in the U.S. that our services here are on the Sabbath, unless we explained, they thought we meant on Sonday, because in the West they made Sunday the Sabbath, moving back the proper seventh day Sabbath to being the sixth day of the week.  The weekend was Saturday-Sunday.  If someone writes a date like this:  7/12/15; does it mean July 12, 2015; or, Dec 7, 2015?

It seems as if the confusion of languages at Babel has also included the confusion of time! Continue reading “No One Knows The Day Or Hour – 27 Feb 2015”

BIRTH, DEATH, AND GOOD FRIDAY OF MESSIAH YESHUA THE LORD – 12 Dec 2012

I just did a quick count-down and count-up and came to this conclusion on this fourth day of Hanukkah:  if Jesus died in 30 AD (which is 40 years before the Temple’s destruction; mentioned in the Babylonian Talmud, Yoma 39b, and also referred to in the Jerusalem Talmud; see http://www3.telus.net/public/kstam/en/temple/details/evidence.htm  ), and was 33 1/2 yrs old (having begun His 3 1/2 yr public ministry when He was about 30 years old, then He was born in Dec., 5 B.C., by my reckoning. https://www.streamsinthenegev.com/school-of-fish/conception-and-birth-of-john-the-baptiser-and-jesus-the-messiah/  (If He were born in 2 B.C., because of Herod dying in 1 BC instead of in 4 BC before Passover, then His death would have been in 33 AD, which reduces the forty years from the rent veil till the Temple’s destruction).  The magi from the East could have seen His star up to a couple of years before they actually arrived in Bethlehem, Israel.

Yeshua, as the Passover Lamb, began His last week (Passion Week) in Jerusalem on Sunday, the first day of the week (the day after the Sabbath), which would have been the 10th day of the first month (Nisan) leading up to the Passover.  He was “examined” until the 14th of the month (Ex 12), and was found without spot or blemish by the people, by the Jewish rulers (they needed false witnesses in order to “make” Him guilty and condemn Him), and by Pilate and Herod.  He was crucified and died on the afternoon of the 14th of the month, Thursday.  This also fulfills the prophecy connected with Jonah, that Jesus would be in the heart of the Earth for three days and three nights, rising early on the first day of the week as the first-fruits from among the dead, the day after the Sabbath.

“Good Friday” would have been a Sabbath as being the first full day of Passover (Lev 23); and I believe it is called Good Friday because believers — after the fact (and the Holy Spirit from the beginning) — would have come to understand that what took place the day before was actually the greatest victory of all ages and the essence of the Good News and the New Covenant:  Jesus Christ came into the world to save sinners, and to bury our sins with Him, fulfilling the beginning of the Feast of Unleavened Bread at the appointed time of the 15th day of the first month!  HalleluYah!

The Hebrew/Jewish/Messianic roots of New Testament faith are found in the Word of God given to and through Israel.